• Very shortly after Pontin took over the hotel, extra dining capacity was added in the form of a large modern single story extension on the south side of the ‘ball room’ at ground floor level .

    1963 -1990 Hotel Fred Pontin

    Very shortly after Pontin took over the hotel, extra dining capacity was added in the form of a large modern single story extension on the south side of the ‘ball room’ at ground floor level . Find out more »
  • In 1945, a group of cottages were built to provide separate accommodation for guests. A report was submitted by Clough William-Ellis, architect, describing the project as “a projected hotel colony at Farringford, Isle of Wight.”

    1945 - 1963 Hotel Thomas Cook

    In 1945, a group of cottages were built to provide separate accommodation for guests. A report was submitted by Clough William-Ellis, architect, describing the project as “a projected hotel colony at Farringford, Isle of Wight.” Find out more »
  • In 1945, a group of cottages were built to provide separate accommodation for guests. A report was submitted by Clough William-Ellis, architect, describing the project as “a projected hotel colony at Farringford, Isle of Wight.”

    1945 - 1963 Hotel Thomas Cook

    In 1945, a group of cottages were built to provide separate accommodation for guests. A report was submitted by Clough William-Ellis, architect, describing the project as “a projected hotel colony at Farringford, Isle of Wight.” Find out more »
  • The name ‘Farringford’ occurs in various forms in documents from the end of the 13th century and is clearly based around the word ending –ford.

    Pre 19th Century

    The name ‘Farringford’ occurs in various forms in documents from the end of the 13th century and is clearly based around the word ending –ford. Find out more »
  • It is also clear that no building existed on the site until the present house was built

    Construction of the Lodge

    It is also clear that no building existed on the site until the present house was built Find out more »
  • The seat of Ed. Rushworth, Esq. This elegant, newly-erected edifice, about half a mile from Freshwater Gate

    1805 to 1823 Farringford Hill

    The seat of Ed. Rushworth, Esq. This elegant, newly-erected edifice, about half a mile from Freshwater Gate Find out more »
  • The seat of Ed. Rushworth, Esq. This elegant, newly-erected edifice, about half a mile from Freshwater Gate

    1805 to 1823 Farringford Hill

    The seat of Ed. Rushworth, Esq. This elegant, newly-erected edifice, about half a mile from Freshwater Gate Find out more »
  • In or before 1825 the house was bought by John Hamborough who added the Gothic embellishments and extended the house westwards, creating most of the present frontage.

    1823-1844 Additions By John Hamborough

    In or before 1825 the house was bought by John Hamborough who added the Gothic embellishments and extended the house westwards, creating most of the present frontage. Find out more »
  • In or before 1825 the house was bought by John Hamborough who added the Gothic embellishments and extended the house westwards, creating most of the present frontage.

    1823-1844 Additions By John Hamborough

    In or before 1825 the house was bought by John Hamborough who added the Gothic embellishments and extended the house westwards, creating most of the present frontage. Find out more »
  • ... Have you seen E? I shall have to give up this place out of pure disgust at the conduct of Seymour I expect.

    Additions by Alfred Lord Tennyson

    ... Have you seen E? I shall have to give up this place out of pure disgust at the conduct of Seymour I expect. Find out more »
  • ... Have you seen E? I shall have to give up this place out of pure disgust at the conduct of Seymour I expect.

    Additions by Alfred Lord Tennyson

    ... Have you seen E? I shall have to give up this place out of pure disgust at the conduct of Seymour I expect. Find out more »
  • The actual phases of extensions at the west end have resulted in a somewhat awkward-looking, and structurally unsound development.

    1892 -1939 Additions by Hallam Tennyson

    The actual phases of extensions at the west end have resulted in a somewhat awkward-looking, and structurally unsound development. Find out more »
  • The actual phases of extensions at the west end have resulted in a somewhat awkward-looking, and structurally unsound development.

    1892 -1939 Additions by Hallam Tennyson

    The actual phases of extensions at the west end have resulted in a somewhat awkward-looking, and structurally unsound development. Find out more »
  • Very shortly after Pontin took over the hotel, extra dining capacity was added in the form of a large modern single story extension on the south side of the ‘ball room’ at ground floor level .

    1963 -1990 Hotel Fred Pontin

    Very shortly after Pontin took over the hotel, extra dining capacity was added in the form of a large modern single story extension on the south side of the ‘ball room’ at ground floor level . Find out more »
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1928 - 1945 Lionel Tennyson

Elvin, Laurence, Farringford. A Short Guide. Farringford Hotel, 1981.

 

Just about the time when I joined the staff of the Dunlop company, my uncle Hallam, Lord Tennyson died (in 1928), leaving me one of his Executors. The responsibility of dealing with Farringford was considerable, for the dark, rather dilapidated old house – “Wuthering Heights, Augustine Birrell called it – could not be brought up to modern standards of living without substantial expenses. Moreover, it was by no means certain that my cousin, the cricketer (Lionel, Lord Tennyson) would be willing to live in it, even when the improvements had been made.

 

During the next few years, my wife and I had to make several visits to Farringford, and from 1933 to 1935 we made it our holiday home, as my cousin did not live there and the place was suffering from lack of supervision. I was very glad that my three sons should have this chance of getting to know the place, and the time we spent there brought me much happiness, both for this reason and through the renewal of old memories and associations.

 

Our residence there helped me carrying out the duty of going through all the family papers, including a large correspondence with many of the most famous personalities of the Victorian age, the poet’s proof sheets and Trial books and a considerable number of fragmentary MSS, some published, some of unpublished work, and some early drafts of work subsequently revised. These MSS included hardly any completed scripts, as my uncle had already given most of these to Trinity College, Cambridge and other libraries .” [Charles eventually placed most of this material with Harvard, and also used them to write his study of Alfred, much of this researched in the London Library during lunchtimes away from his desk at Dunlop.]

Tennyson, Sir Charles Bruce,Stars and Markets. Chatto & Windus 1957.

 

Farringford was closed during World War II; happily it was not occupied by troops or others so its valuable contents remained intact .”

Elvin, Laurence, Farringford. A Short Guide. Farringford Hotel, 1981.

 

My life long interest in the life and work of Alfred Tennyson came about as a result of a visit, in 1949, to Farringford House with Elizabeth, where Mr. Waters, the Tennyson’s old retainer, allowed us to look over the building, and where, in the poet’s study, we passed a large part of the day taking inventory of his relics, books and pictures. After his son Hallam’s death in 1928, the place went to rack and ruin for 11 years, and the rain penetrated the roof. Mr Waters and his wife attempted the upkeep of the building, but the prospect was a grim one. In time Mr Waters collected the poet’s belongings together for the museum ( see postcard of around this time) but these were then held by the Trustees at the bank .”

Richard Hutchings, Love of an Island (County Press nd)

 

From 1935, Farringford was being advertised to let in the newspapers by Knight, Frank & Rutley, of Hanover Square, London. These adverts continued up to the war.

House for Sale 1939
Advert 30/12/39 [159M88/53]

By Direction of the Trustees of Lord Tennyson

The Farringford Estate

Residential and Agricultural Estate of 235 Acres

 

The House includes 2 halls, 4 reception rooms, ballroom, 4 best and 5 secondary bedrooms, 5 bathrooms, ample servants' rooms and usual offices.

Companies' electric light and water.

Garage. Stabling.

Timbered grounds, kitchen garden and small park.

 

The Estate includes Farringford Farm and buildings, The Terrace House, Baker's Farmhouse and 16 other small Houses and Cottages.

 

Actual and Estimated Rental about £1,044 P A

Agents: Messrs. Frank & Rutley, 20 Hanover Square, W1.

The Hotel was still being advertised in 1940 in The Times by Messrs Knight, Frank & Rutley:

House for Sale 1940

“Would recommend and would come back.” Mrs W, Hampshire

Farringford · Bedbury Lane · Freshwater Bay · Isle of Wight · PO40 9PE · UK · © Farringford Estate Ltd 2013 · Company Reg No 590 4013